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    Saturday, March 21, 2009

    Diverticulitis

    I've been sick for the past couple of days, and just had a stiff neck neck yesterday and what could be worse than receiving a text message from your dad saying he was at the hospital?! It completely tore me apart and left me crying in bed. I was in shock when I read his message. He just found out that he has diverticulitis. My dad lives in California which is thousands of miles away from me & aside from the fact that I've always been a daddy's girl really hit me deep. He's home now & the Dr. prescribed him some antibiotics for initial treatment. I hope it cures fast cuz if it doesn't it might end up with a colon cancer. (*knock on wood*) Please pray for my dad. :'(

    What are diverticulosis and diverticulitis?

    Many people have small pouches in the lining of the colon, or large intestine, that bulge outward through weak spots. Each pouch is called a diverticulum. Multiple pouches are called diverticula. The condition of having diverticula is called diverticulosis. About 10 percent of Americans older than 40 have diverticulosis. The condition becomes more common as people age. About half of all people older than 60 have diverticulosis.



    Diverticula are most common in the lower portion of the large intestine, called the sigmoid colon. When the pouches become inflamed, the condition is called diverticulitis. Ten to 25 percent of people with diverticulosis get diverticulitis. Diverticulosis and diverticulitis together are called diverticular disease.

    The most common symptom of diverticulitis is abdominal pain. The most common sign on examination is tenderness in the lower left side of the abdomen. Usually, the pain is severe and comes on suddenly, but it can also be mild and become worse over several days. The intensity of the pain can fluctuate. A person may experience cramping, nausea, vomiting, fever, chills, or a change in bowel habits.

    Diverticulitis can lead to bleeding; infections; small tears, called perforations; or blockages in the colon. These complications always require treatment to prevent them from progressing and causing serious illness.

    A high-fiber diet and pain medications help relieve symptoms in most cases of diverticulosis. Uncomplicated diverticulitis with mild symptoms usually requires the person to rest, take oral antibiotics, and be on a liquid diet for a period of time. Sometimes an attack of diverticulitis is serious enough to require a hospital stay, intravenous (IV) antibiotics, and possibly surgery.

    Depending on the severity of symptoms, the doctor may recommend bed rest, oral antibiotics, a pain reliever, and a liquid diet. If symptoms ease after a few days, the doctor will recommend gradually increasing the amount of high-fiber foods in the diet.
    Severe cases of diverticulitis with acute pain and complications will likely require a hospital stay. Most cases of severe diverticulitis are treated with IV antibiotics and a few days without food or drink to help the colon rest. In some cases, surgery may be necessary.

    *Diverticulosis occurs when small pouches called diverticula bulge outward through weak spots in the colon, or large intestine.
    *Most people with diverticulosis never have any discomfort or symptoms.
    *Diverticula form when pressure builds inside the colon wall, usually because of constipation.
    *The most likely cause of diverticulosis is a low-fiber diet because it increases constipation and pressure inside the colon.
    *For most people with diverticulosis, eating a high-fiber diet is the only treatment needed.
    *Fiber intake can be increased by eating whole-grain breads and cereals; fruits like apples and pears; vegetables like peas, spinach, and squash; and starchy vegetables like kidney and black beans.
    *Diverticulitis occurs when the pouches become inflamed and cause pain and tenderness in the lower left side of the abdomen.
    *Diverticulitis can lead to bleeding; infections; small tears, called perforations; or blockages in the colon. These complications always require treatment to prevent them from progressing and causing serious illness.
    *Severe cases of diverticulitis with acute pain and complications will likely require a hospital stay. When a person has complications or does not respond to medication, surgery may be necessary.

    WHAT FOODS HAVE FIBER?

    • Bread, Cereal, Beans
    • Fruits (apple & pear w/ skin, raspberries, prunes)
    • Vegetables (squash, sweet potato w/ skin, green peas, potato, spinach, cauliflower)

    7 comments:

    xoannie said...

    Your dad is in my prayers sweetie!

    Miss Katin said...

    Hi Leigh.. how are you? I hope everything will be okay. Oddly enough we were just talking about diverticulitis at a staff meeting last week. For some reason there has been an increase in the number of patients in our hospital admitted with this. Please know that you and your dad will be in my prayers. Take care of yourself as well...

    M said...

    oh no! I hope everything works out for the better with you dad. My prayers are with your dad. take care of yourself too!

    eri said...

    oh my!!! i hope your dad will be ok! i'll keep you all in my prayers. it's tough having family members in the hospital. it's such a helpless feeling.

    stay strong.

    Katrina M said...

    My prayers are w/ur dad and ur family. i hope he will get better soon! hang in there!

    ♥Leigh♥ said...

    Thank you so much for all the kind words and prayers Ladies. I really needed all that right now. We're really having a hard time coping with all the problems esp. financial wise.As I've mentioned from my previous post,my baby sister is also going to under go an eye operation next month,so...*sigh* this is leaving me all teary eyed.. ='( I hope for the best and success for good health with my family.

    K said...

    Oh no! I hope you are doing OK and that your father will be OK as well. You and your family are in my prayers!